Chateau Moulin de Tricot

Moulin-de-Tricot-logo Tricot - Appellation Margaux Moulin-de-Tricot
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Château Moulin de Tricot is a tiny property established in the 19th Century by the ancestors of the current proprietor, Bruno Rey. Monsieur Rey and his wife, Pascale, tend the vineyards that are situated 30 km north of the city of Bordeaux, in the heart of the Margaux appellation. The Rey family owns just shy of five (5) hectares of vineyards on a gravelly “croupe” (outcropping) in the commune of Arsac. Of the five hectares, 3.7 hectares are within the Margaux appellation and 1.2 hectares are classified as Haut-Médoc.

The soils at Moulin de Tricot are a mix of sand and gravel sitting on a subsoil of clay and marl. The sandy gravel provides excellent drainage while the clay in the subsoil provides moisture to the vines deep roots. Local traditions are lovingly followed at Moulin de Tricot. Vineyards are cultivated without the use of chemical herbicides and are tightly spaced. The close spacing results in higher density per hectare (9500 plants/ha), but lower yield per vine, guaranteeing greater richness of polyphenols in the ripe grapes. Moulin de Tricot stands virtually alone as it continues to follow the classic style of Margaux: utilizing Cabernet Sauvignon as the dominant grape variety. Cabernet accounts for 75% of the vineyards, Merlot the remaining 25%. The vines average 30 years of age (as of 2011).

All grapes are hand harvested at Moulin de Tricot. A strict triage is done in the vineyard so that only healthy, ripe grapes are selected and sent to the chai for vinification. The grapes are destemmed before being crushed and racked into the tanks for fermentation. Bruno Rey vinifies his wines with traditional methods using modern equipment. He has chosen to use stainless steel tanks for fermentation as they allow him to control the temperature more precisely, when necessary. After fermentation, the wine is pressed and then returned to the stainless steel tanks for the malolactic fermentation (ML). Following the malolactic, the wine is then racked into small barrels, none of which are new (a portion of the wine is aged in 1 year old oak with the remainder of the barrels being older). An egg-white fining is the only other treatment the wine receives prior to being blended for final bottling.

Two wines are produced at Chateau Moulin de Tricot: an Haut-Médoc and the Margaux.

Moulin-de-Tricot-Haut-Medoc-NV Chateau Moulin de Tricot Haut-Médoc: The Rey family produces approximately 12,000 bottles per year of their Haut-Médoc. This wine is fermented in stainless steel tanks and is then racked into small barrel (none of which is new) for one year before being assembled and bottled. Each year we purchase 3600 bottles of this production for the US market.
Moulin-de-Tricot Chateau Moulin de Tricot Margaux: This small jewel of an estate produces a mere 15,000 bottles of Margaux per annum. We are fortunate to have access to at least 3600 bottles per year (plus a small number of magnums and double magnums!) of this superb wine. Heavily dependent on Cabernet Sauvignon (at least three-fourths of the cuvée), this wine has a distinguished structure and complex flavors that beg for additional aging in the bottle. The elevage in barrel extends for eighteen months at which point the wine is bottled without filtration.
Download Moulin-de-Tricot tech sheet
Domaine NameChâteau Moulin de Tricot
Family/Owners NameBruno et Pascale REY
How many years has the family owned the domaine?Since 1804
How many generations?Only 1 generation can work on the estate. It is too small for many generations
How many hectares of vines are leased?0 ha
How many hectares of vines are owned?4.6 ha
Are your vineyards or wines Organic or Biodynamic Certified? If yes, in the EU? In the US? If no, are you in the process of becoming certified? When? Lutte raisonnee
Describe your vineyard management practices (e.g. low-intervention, organic, biodynamic, standard, etc.). PLEASE ALSO ADDRESS THE FOLLOWING IN YOUR REPLY: Do you do field work and harvest manually? By machine? By horse? Do you practice green harvest? Leaf thinning? How do you fertilize?All the vine-plan works are made by hand : Pruning, Folding, De-budding, Tying-up, Leaf-thinning, Harvest. Mechanical work for the soil (ex : scraping), because we don’t use chemical weedkilling. We use only organic manure at the end of the winter.
Do you typically sell or buy any grapes? Please specify.No
Do you sell off any of your wine en vrac/allo sfuso?No, everything in bottles
WINE 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
AppellationMARGAUX
Cepage/UvaggioCabernet Sauvignon et Merlot
%ABVBetween 12.5% and 13% by vol, according to vintages
# of bottles producedAbout 22000 botlles
Grams of Residual Sugar
VINEYARD AND GROWING INFORMATION
Vineyard/lieu dit name(s) and locations13 plots
Soil Types(s)gravels
Average vine age (per vineyard)30 years
Average Vine Density (vines/HA)10000 vines/ha
Approximate harvest date(s)Late September early October
WINEMAKING/CELLAR INFORMATION
% whole cluster, % destemmedDestemmed and soft crushing
Fermentation: vessel type and sizeStainless steel tank
Duration of cuvaison25 to 30 days according to years
Select or indigenous yeast?Select yeasts
Please share notes about winemaking process for this wine. PLEASE ADDRESS THE FOLLOWING, IF APPLICABLE: pump-overs, punch-downs, racking, movement/transfer of wine done by gravity or pumping?), battonnage, malolactic fermentation allowed, chaptalizationPumping-over mainly, during the alcoholic and malolactic fermentation
Elevage: vessel type(s) and size(s)Ageing in french oak barrels
Duration of elevage18 months
Duration of bottle ageing before release to US market6 months
Do you practice fining and filtration? If yes, please describeFining and soft filtration for the bottling
Do you add sulfur? If so when and how much? How much sulfur remains in the wine at release?SO2 is necessary, we add only the lower limit
WINE 2
GENERAL INFORMATION
AppellationHAUT-MEDOC
Cepage/UvaggioCabernet Sauvignon and Merlot
%ABVBetween 12,5% and 13% alc by vol according to vintages
# of bottles produced10 000 bottles
Grams of Residual Sugar
VINEYARD AND GROWING INFORMATION
Vineyard/lieu dit name(s) and locations13 plots
Soil Types(s)Gravels
Average vine age (per vineyard)20 years
Average Vine Density (vines/HA)8 500 vines/ha
Approximate harvest date(s)Late September, early October
WINEMAKING/CELLAR INFORMATION
% whole cluster, % destemmedDestemmed and soft crushing
Fermentation: vessel type and sizeStainless steel tanks
Duration of cuvaison25 to 30 days according to year
Select or indigenous yeast?Select yeasts
Please share notes about winemaking process for this wine. PLEASE ADDRESS THE FOLLOWING, IF APPLICABLE: pump-overs, punch-downs, racking, movement/transfer of wine done by gravity or pumping?), battonnage, malolactic fermentation allowed, chaptalizationMainly pumping-overs during the alcoholic fermentation. Malolactic fermentation
Elevage: vessel type(s) and size(s)French oak barrels
Duration of elevage18 months
Duration of bottle ageing before release to US market6 months
Do you practice fining and filtration? If yes, please describeFining and soft filtration before the bottling
Do you add sulfur? If so when and how much? How much sulfur remains in the wine at release?SO2 is necessary, we add only the lower limit
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