New Releases from Château Le Puy: 2017 “Emilien” and 2019 Duc des Nauves

Posted on Posted in Le Puy, Rosenthal Wine Merchant News, RWM Contributor

For us here at Rosenthal Wine Merchant, as well as for countless drinkers across the country, Château Le Puy has greatly expanded our notion of what Bordeaux can be—aesthetically, philosophically, and historically. In a region teeming with commercially minded product and still suffering from the excesses of an era during which power was seemingly prized over grace, Le Puy is a beacon Read More

rosenthal wine merchant

by Clarke Boehling Twenty years ago, no one could have predicted the Jura’s current popularity. When Rosenthal Wine Merchant first introduced the now-legendary wines of Jacques Puffeney to the American market in the mid-1990s …READ MORE by Dillon Lerach Macerated Whites from Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Alsace, and Piedmont Joško Gravner, like many of the greatest vintners

Your Next Lesson: Value Bordeaux

Posted on Posted in Articles, Chateau Moulin de Tricot, Le Puy, Wine Press

By Eric Asimov Feb. 1, 2018 For our next topic, let’s return to what may now be familiar ground, Bordeaux. Previously, we’ve looked at two very different appellations within Bordeaux, Haut-Médoc and Pomerol. This time, the topic will be defined by value rather than place. The dominant image of Bordeaux is one of imposing chateaus,

Chateau Le Puy

The estate is situated on the same plateau as Saint Emilion and Pomerol and sits on the second highest point in the Gironde at 110 meters above sea level (approximately 350 feet). Jean-Pierre Amoreau, Chateau Le Puy, Barthélemy, Emilien

History of RWM

The Mad Rose Group is a family-run organization that is composed of a close-knit group of people who understand that wine is an agricultural product and that in its best and purest form wine must reflect a specific sense of place. We share the goal of communicating this concept to a growing audience by presenting

Producers

France We fell in love with France a long, long time ago…well before our immersion in wine. Reading Stendahl, Flaubert and Montaigne or Camus, Sartre and Beckett (yes, an Irishman but writing in French), one encounters the human condition, each man’s struggle to make something of value out of one’s brief existential moment. Great French